Monday, January 31, 2011

FDR and the maximum wage

From Too Much weekly:
In April 1942, just a few months after Pearl Harbor, Roosevelt asked Congress to enact a 100 percent top federal income tax rate, in effect a “maximum wage.” No individual, FDR told lawmakers, should be taking home, after taxes, over $25,000 — the equivalent of about $335,000 today.

FDR's call for a $25,000 personal income limit struck millions of patriotic Americans as right on the mark. A Gallup poll, in late 1942, found 47 percent of Americans supporting the notion of an income limit and only 38 percent in opposition. And the supporters of FDR's $25,000 cap even included some of Ronnie Reagan's fellow Hollywood stars.

“I regret,” the widely admired Ann Sheridan told reporters, “that I have only one salary to give for my country.”

Sheridan was following in the footsteps of an even more widely admired film star, Carole Lombard. In 1937, notes film historian Eric Hoyt, Lombard paid over $300,000 in federal taxes on $465,000 in income.

“I was glad to do it, too,” she told reporters. “Income tax money all goes into improvement and protection of the country.”

No other news item, the New Yorker magazine would later relate, probably “ever did so much to increase the popularity of a star.”

Most of America's highest income-earners, predictably enough, didn't share either Lombard’s or Sheridan's sentiments. They howled in protest at FDR’s 1942 income cap proposal, and Congress felt their pain — but only to an extent. Lawmakers didn't buy FDR's 100 percent top rate, but they came close.

America’s rich would end the war years facing a 94 percent tax rate on income over $200,000.

America's rich would see, after World War II, only limited relief from that 94 percent top rate. In 1948, over President Harry Truman's veto, the GOP-controlled Congress did drop the top tax rate down to 82 percent. But the top rate would jump back over 90 percent during the Korean War, and the top rate would sit fixed — at 91 percent — straight through the 1950s.

Not until 1964 did that top rate start dipping, down to 70 percent. In 1981, the newly elected President Ronald Reagan would make gutting that 70 percent rate his first major White House priority. By 1986, after two Reagan tax cuts, the top rate on the top income bracket had shrunk to a mere 28 percent.