Monday, August 18, 2014

Perhaps this will become my annual post about awards

History tells us there's no connection between what wins and what's remembered. Well, except for the winners that make people say, "What drugs were popular that year?" For example, generally considered the worst book to win the Hugo: They'd Rather Be Right, remembered only for a distinction few writers desire.

It is a greater honor to be nominated than to win. Only the pettiest people will quibble with whether something deserves to be nominated, but most people will wonder why the winner won. I say "most people" because most of the time, perhaps all of the time, the majority does not choose the winner. The largest minority does. In some scenarios, like judged awards, the winner can't be the work that was most loved, because the most loved works also tend to be the most hated. In those situations, the winner is the one that most judges can agree on, so the result is not "best" in anyone's opinion but "most innocuous".

That said, there's no shame in winning an award, so if you won one, yay, you!