Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Ayn Rand's Favorite Serial Killer

Ayn Rand, Hugely Popular Author and Inspiration to Right-Wing Leaders, Was a Big Admirer of Serial Killer | | AlterNet

8 comments:

  1. So that's why I'm having so much trouble finishing Atlas Shrugged and why most people grow out of Objectivism when they reach their thirties.

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  2. I read The Fountainhead when I was in college and thought it was bloated and simplistic, but never tried Atlas Shrugged. I just reserved it from the library 'cause I'm feeling like I want to stare into the abyss. She's cited by so many self-obsessed people that I want to see if she actually converts people or only validates them. (I suspect the latter, but still...)

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  3. Blue, I'd forgotten that one! Posting it now....

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  4. My problem with Rand is that I find her style unreadable. I'll never know from first hand knowledge if I agree with her politics, because I just can't finish any of her books.

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  5. I'd like to offer a bit of advice, if I may.

    When you set about to initiate or perpetuate a smear campaign against someone like Ayn Rand, it would serve you better to pick a subject that someone other than the ignorant would actually believe. Anyone who knows anything at all about Ayn Rand would never believe that she would admire someone for any kind of violence, much less for killing children, as no one was more adamant in opposing aggression (initiation of force) than she.

    Of course, you may simply have been wishing to appeal to the ignorant in this discussion; if so, you seem to have succeeded.

    In any case, good luck with your future smears.

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  6. byafi, she said what she said. Did you read the article? Or follow the link to the Slate article?

    http://www.slate.com/id/2233966

    It has this: Rand wrote great stretches of praise for him, saying he represented "the amazing picture of a man with no regard whatsoever for all that a society holds sacred, and with a consciousness all his own. A man who really stands alone, in action and in soul. … Other people do not exist for him, and he does not see why they should." She called him "a brilliant, unusual, exceptional boy," shimmering with "immense, explicit egotism." Rand had only one regret: "A strong man can eventually trample society under its feet. That boy [Hickman] was not strong enough."

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  7. I got about a third of the way through The Fountainhead. I actually liked the writing style because it was prettier than the text books I was reading at the time. (She does some interesting things with language.) Couldn't stand her characters or the ideology she was pushing, though. Never tried reading any of her other books.

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  8. Odd how the common idea of the sociopath differs from the actual condition that a psychiatrist would call "antisocial personality disorder".

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