Wednesday, May 11, 2011

socialist Bible verse of the day: Deuteronomy 15:1-2, Leviticus 25:10

"At the end of every seven years you must cancel debts. This is how it is to be done: Every creditor shall cancel the loan he has made to his fellow Israelite. He shall not require payment from his fellow Israelite or brother, because the LORD's time for canceling debts has been proclaimed." —Deuteronomy 15:1-2

"Consecrate the fiftieth year and proclaim liberty throughout the land to all its inhabitants. It shall be a jubilee for you; each one of you is to return to his family property and each to his own clan." —Leviticus 25:10

Brother Will says: According to the early books of the Bible, every seven years, there's supposed be a shmita, the sabbatical year or the "year of release". Every fifty years, there's supposed to be a jubilee, which in Hebrew is a yobhel. Think of them as small freeings from debt and large ones. If anyone tells you this is a Christian nation, ask them when we last had a jubilee. Kings and priests and presidents have made only the most token concessions to these verses since they were composed. It took a civil war to give a jubilee to the USA's slaves. We're still waiting for one for everyone who has been in debt for seven years or more.

8 comments:

  1. I'd hate to think of the monthly payments on a house if it were only a seven year loan!

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  2. In a sharing world, everyone could earn or inherit a home in less than seven years. Don't get me going on the insanity of capitalist housing principles: Macmansions and debt.

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  3. And a huge part of the cost of housing is regulations written for union votes, rather than consideration of the homeowner. There are far, far better, cheaper, and safer ways to build houses than the ones the laws demand, but any lawmaker attempting to modernize those laws would be out on his ear faster than you can say "picket line".

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  4. Wrong, Joel. Housing regulations are made by lawmakers who're financed by the building industry. That's why there are few regulations on how large a house can be, but plenty on how small it can be. I've been following the Tiny House movement for years now. It's not the unions that're the problem. Well, except in Republican mythology.

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  5. Ah- so it's the building industry that forbids steel buildings to be used for human habitation? It's the building industry that says it's ok to build skyscrapers out of steel and concrete, but homes must have a wooden stud every 16 inches to be considered safe? It's the building industry that got laws passed that an electrician must have attended a union electrical school to be competent to wire a house? At least, here in Indiana the chief engineer at GE would not be legally competent to do so unless he attended that union school. Despite the evidence of neolithic huts older than Homo Sapiens Sapiens, buildings made of fitted stone are not legally safe for habitation here; they must be mortared by masons who have attended certified schools... which coincidently, like the electrician schools, are union schools. Despite the evidence of Epcot, domes aren't legally safe for human habitation here, either- unless you add that 2x4 stud every 16 inches. There are similar plumbing laws, too. It's amazing how the building industry in Indiana has gotten laws passed that funnel all home construction through union bottlenecks. Mighty egalitarian of them.

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  6. What I was talking about before were not quality issues. You could mill a house from a solid block of Titanium, and it wouldn't be legally "safe" in Indiana unless the walls had a wooden stud every 16 inches.

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  7. I don't doubt that there are housing regulations that are antiquated; that's a problem with all laws. But where were unions, not builders, agitating for more restrictive house building laws?

    I recommend the "Legal and Regulatory Issues with Building Small" part of this:

    http://www.greenbiz.com/news/2005/07/12/small-beautiful-us-house-size-resource-use-and-environment

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  8. Joel, if you prefer to believe that building contractors don't fight to get regulations passed that will maximize their profit, that's fine.

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