Saturday, August 30, 2014

Drax the Destroyer and the Metaphor Police

I recommend a charming little post at Just Keep Swimming Swimming Swimming. It begins, "I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. "

It reminded me that SJWs don't do metaphors. Now, I'm not saying all SJWs are autistic or that all autistic people are SJWs or even that there's more than anecdotal evidence for a link between SJWs and autism. I'm just noting that they don't understand metaphors—perhaps the best example is their difficulty with "colorblind", which they think implies an inability to recognize hue.

I'm very tempted to refer to SJWs as Draxes from now on. But I think I'll resist that.

Friday, August 29, 2014

Our Minnesota State Fair trips—mostly, seed art!

Emma and I only made two trips to the State Fair this year. I brought along my old iPod and took a few pictures, which I rarely do because my general philosophy is that you can experience an event or record it. And okay, if experiencing recording something is your idea of fun, fine, but it ain't mine. So most of our State Fair experience is not recorded here.

Emma does like to take pictures sometimes. On our first trip, she decided to take pictures of things that amused her, so I decided to take pictures of her taking pictures. (Yes, inside, I'm still thirteen.) If she posts hers, I'll add a link.

Click pics to bigify them.

A warm-up picture that I like, even if it's not in focus.

My favorite picture of Emma taking a picture.

Just because.

 Emma realizes I've been taking pictures of her taking pictures. (That sign amused her.)


 
Steampunk made it to the fair.

Dr. Who did, too. In seed art, like the next few pics.









I wish I had a better picture of the piece on the right. Emma thought it would inspire a great book cover.

Anti-racists have yet to convince Minnesota's Asian community that "Oriental" is offensive. (ETA: As noted in a Twitter discussion, I don't remember hearing anyone refer to a person as Oriental in ages. But the word is still very common in business names.)



Butter sculptures being carved of Princess Kay and the princesses of the Milky Way. No, I didn't move—the platform rotates so everyone can get a good look at art in progress.

A bird of prey at the DNR area.

Emma and Betsy Pucci Stemple.

Proof that Republicans are stealth socialists.

A selfie.

A twofie.

This is a horribly unrepresentative record of our time at the fair. Maybe next year, I'll take pics of what we eat. Which always includes deep fried cheese curds in the food hall, honey lemonade, honey ice cream, all the milk you can drink, and craft beer. We had the beer-battered onion rings at the Ball Park Cafe for the first time, and they were mighty fine. But really, it's the greatest state fair. You can't go wrong.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Russia, what's better, what's worse—a note by Rachel Rubin

In a message (shared with permission) Rachel Rubin wrote,
I am writing this in Moscow, and thinking about our conversation about Russia's before/after. I have been asking everyone old enough to remember to tell me one thing that is better, and one thing that is worse. It's actually been really painful, if fascinating--all the senior citizens with pensions gone, etc. One street artist (incredibly gifted) answered the question for a long time, summing up, "Well, now we have all these things (cars, cellphones, etc.) that we didn't have before. But now we are all about those things."

Monday, August 18, 2014

Perhaps this will become my annual post about awards

History tells us there's no connection between what wins and what's remembered. Well, except for the winners that make people say, "What drugs were popular that year?" For example, generally considered the worst book to win the Hugo: They'd Rather Be Right, remembered only for a distinction few writers desire.

It is a greater honor to be nominated than to win. Only the pettiest people will quibble with whether something deserves to be nominated, but most people will wonder why the winner won. I say "most people" because most of the time, perhaps all of the time, the majority does not choose the winner. The largest minority does. In some scenarios, like judged awards, the winner can't be the work that was most loved, because the most loved works also tend to be the most hated. In those situations, the winner is the one that most judges can agree on, so the result is not "best" in anyone's opinion but "most innocuous".

That said, there's no shame in winning an award, so if you won one, yay, you!

Friday, August 8, 2014